NMIN

EVENTS

HQP Research Presentation Series

Ongoing 

Up-coming

29 April 2021

Past

25 March 2021

Resources (slides in PDF, video recordings) are available for most past capacity building webinars.

NMIN

HQP Research Presentation Series

More sessions are being planned…

Second Round

Thursday 29 April 2021

12:30 – 1:30 pm PDT | 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT

Details forthcoming. Check back soon.

PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

PRESENTERS

Stable J-aggregation of an aza- BODIPY-lipid in a liposome for optical cancer imaging

We present the synthesis of a novel aza-BODIPY-lipid building block and its self-assembly into BODIPYsome, which has optically stable NIR J-aggregation that is attributed to -J-dimerization. BODIPYsomes exhibit a high extinction coefficient and high fluorescence quenching, enabling photoacoustic when intact and recovered NIR fluorescence once disrupted for in vivo cancer imaging.

Miffy Hok Yan Cheng received her B.Sc. (Hons) in Chemistry with Molecular Medicine in 2014 from the University of Hull, UK. She obtained a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry with Prof Ross Boyle in 2018 at the same institution. Her PhD studies included the development of NIR fluorescence probe and the bioconjugation to targeting moieties such as antibodies and peptides. After her PhD, she began her postdoctoral fellow position in Princess Margaret Cancer Centre with Prof Gang Zheng in 2018, and since her research has been focused on the synthesis and development of organic building blocks for lipid-based nanotechnologies in biomedical imaging.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: hok-yan.cheng@uhnresearch.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.

Miffy Cheng

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Nanoparticle Enhanced, Impedance-Based Biosensor Development for Cancer Diagnosis

Current research shows urinary metabolites can be classified as biomarkers for colon cancer. Colon cancer is primarily diagnosed with colonoscopies and blood tests: both of which are extremely invasive. It is our goal to develop a biosensor that uses nanoparticles bound with metabolites for normalization, to detect the presence of free metabolites in the urine samples of patients.

Payton LeBlanc is a third year student completing her Bachelor of Science specializing in Immunology and Infection. She is currently interning as an undergraduate researcher at the Wishart Lab located at the University of Alberta. For the past six months, she has participated in developing an impedance-based biosensor that utilizes nanoparticles to enhance colon cancer diagnostics.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: pleblanc@ualberta.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.
PAYTON

Payton LeBlanc

University of Alberta

Microfluidic Co-encapsulation of Curcumin with SN-38 in PCL-block-PEO Polymer Nanoparticles

In this presentation, I describe my work co-encapsulating the chemotherapy drug SN-38 with curcumin in polymer nanoparticles, using microfluidic nanoprecipitation. Curcumin improves the encapsulation efficiency of SN-38 and changes the physico-chemical properties of the particle.

Liza Silverman graduated from MIT with a BSc in biology and from Hebrew University of Jerusalem with an MSc in biochemistry. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Victoria in the department of chemistry, studying nanoparticles for drug delivery. She also studied nanoparticles, and particularly Doxil, while working in industry. Her current research in the group of Prof. Matt Moffitt focuses on encapsulating SN-38 in polymer nanoparticles. She is working to increase the encapsulation efficiency of SN-38. When not in the lab, Liza enjoys knitting and being anywhere near the ocean.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: silverman.liza@gmail.com

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.
LIZA

Liza Silverman

University of Victoria

An analysis of the function and structure of the protein corona on nanoparticles

Nanomaterials can adsorb blood proteins on their surface, forming the so-called protein corona. In this study, we studied the function and structure of these adsorbed proteins. We also demonstrated how this information could help us design better nanomaterials for in vivo use.

Johnny Zhang is a 5th year PhD student from Professor Warren Chan’s lab at the University of Toronto. He studies nanomaterial-protein interactions and designs functional nanomaterials for applications in medicine. He also develops immunoassay using nanomaterials for diagnosing infectious diseases like SARS-CoV-2. He obtained BSc from Mount Allison University with First Class Honours with distinction.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: johnnykta.zhang@mail.utoronto.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.

JOHNNY

Johnny Zhang

University of Toronto

View the presentations

The HQP Research Presentation Series gives NMIN HQP the opportunity to collaboratively develop their poster presentation skills, deliver a presentation in a supportive environment, and to receive constructive feedback from qualified professionals.

First Round

Thursday 25 March 2021

12:30 – 1:30 pm PDT | 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT

PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

PRESENTERS

Stable J-aggregation of an aza- BODIPY-lipid in a liposome for optical cancer imaging

We present the synthesis of a novel aza-BODIPY-lipid building block and its self-assembly into BODIPYsome, which has optically stable NIR J-aggregation that is attributed to -J-dimerization. BODIPYsomes exhibit a high extinction coefficient and high fluorescence quenching, enabling photoacoustic when intact and recovered NIR fluorescence once disrupted for in vivo cancer imaging.

Miffy Hok Yan Cheng received her B.Sc. (Hons) in Chemistry with Molecular Medicine in 2014 from the University of Hull, UK. She obtained a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry with Prof Ross Boyle in 2018 at the same institution. Her PhD studies included the development of NIR fluorescence probe and the bioconjugation to targeting moieties such as antibodies and peptides. After her PhD, she began her postdoctoral fellow position in Princess Margaret Cancer Centre with Prof Gang Zheng in 2018, and since her research has been focused on the synthesis and development of organic building blocks for lipid-based nanotechnologies in biomedical imaging.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: hok-yan.cheng@uhnresearch.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.

Miffy Cheng

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Nanoparticle Enhanced, Impedance-Based Biosensor Development for Cancer Diagnosis

Current research shows urinary metabolites can be classified as biomarkers for colon cancer. Colon cancer is primarily diagnosed with colonoscopies and blood tests: both of which are extremely invasive. It is our goal to develop a biosensor that uses nanoparticles bound with metabolites for normalization, to detect the presence of free metabolites in the urine samples of patients.

Payton LeBlanc is a third year student completing her Bachelor of Science specializing in Immunology and Infection. She is currently interning as an undergraduate researcher at the Wishart Lab located at the University of Alberta. For the past six months, she has participated in developing an impedance-based biosensor that utilizes nanoparticles to enhance colon cancer diagnostics.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: pleblanc@ualberta.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.
PAYTON

Payton LeBlanc

University of Alberta

Microfluidic Co-encapsulation of Curcumin with SN-38 in PCL-block-PEO Polymer Nanoparticles

In this presentation, I describe my work co-encapsulating the chemotherapy drug SN-38 with curcumin in polymer nanoparticles, using microfluidic nanoprecipitation. Curcumin improves the encapsulation efficiency of SN-38 and changes the physico-chemical properties of the particle.

Liza Silverman graduated from MIT with a BSc in biology and from Hebrew University of Jerusalem with an MSc in biochemistry. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Victoria in the department of chemistry, studying nanoparticles for drug delivery. She also studied nanoparticles, and particularly Doxil, while working in industry. Her current research in the group of Prof. Matt Moffitt focuses on encapsulating SN-38 in polymer nanoparticles. She is working to increase the encapsulation efficiency of SN-38. When not in the lab, Liza enjoys knitting and being anywhere near the ocean.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: silverman.liza@gmail.com

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.
LIZA

Liza Silverman

University of Victoria

An analysis of the function and structure of the protein corona on nanoparticles

Nanomaterials can adsorb blood proteins on their surface, forming the so-called protein corona. In this study, we studied the function and structure of these adsorbed proteins. We also demonstrated how this information could help us design better nanomaterials for in vivo use.

Johnny Zhang is a 5th year PhD student from Professor Warren Chan’s lab at the University of Toronto. He studies nanomaterial-protein interactions and designs functional nanomaterials for applications in medicine. He also develops immunoassay using nanomaterials for diagnosing infectious diseases like SARS-CoV-2. He obtained BSc from Mount Allison University with First Class Honours with distinction.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: johnnykta.zhang@mail.utoronto.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.

JOHNNY

Johnny Zhang

University of Toronto

View all the presentations

The HQP Research Presentation Series gives NMIN HQP the opportunity to collaboratively develop their poster presentation skills, deliver a presentation in a supportive environment, and to receive constructive feedback from qualified professionals.