NMIN

EVENTS

HQP Research Presentation Series

Ongoing 

Up-coming

27 May 2021

29 July 2021

Past

25 March 2021

29 April 2021

Resources (slides in PDF, video recordings) are available for most past capacity building webinars.

NMIN

HQP Research Presentation Series

Third Round

NMIN HQP Research Presentations

27 May 2021

12:30 – 1:30 pm PDT | 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT

PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

More information coming soon – please check back

PRESENTERS

  • Kent Chen (PI: Marcel Bally)
  • Sheldon Decombe (PI: Aaron Wheeler)
  • Forugh Sanaee (PI: Afsaneh Lavasanifar)
  • Annie (Qurrat) Ul-Ain (PI: Sarah Hedtrich)

Cytopathology diagnostic with multiplexed plasmonic biomarkers

We present herein the development of a new technique, based on plasmonic labeling of live cells before fixation to improve the reliability of cytopathology diagnosis. This cost-effective and sensitive methodology is based on the optical properties of spectrally distinct metallic nanoparticles (NPs), in this case gold and gold-silver alloy NPs, conjugated with specific antibodies to target specific antigens.

Cécile Darviot obtained her engineering degree from École Centrale de Lille and her master’s degree from Polytechnique Montréal in 2018. After studying in vitro a new treatment for retinoblastoma based on the interaction between plasmonic nanoparticles and a nanosecond laser during her master’s thesis, she began a PhD at Polytechnique Montréal, in engineering physics, in January 2019. Her research project mainly focuses on hyperspectral optical imaging of plasmonic biomarkers for a wide range of biomedical applications including cyto– and histopathology.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: cecile.darviot@gmail.com

Cécile Darviot

École Polytechnique de Montréal

Development of a microfluidic chip for exosomal PD-L1 analysis in lung cancer

The use of exosomes as cancer biomarkers is receiving much attention lately due to recent discoveries of their involvement in key cancer physiological pathways. Unfortunately, exosomes are very hard to isolate and detect due to their small sizes. In the Kelley Lab, we have developed a technology that allows for the isolation and sorting of exosomes based on their protein biomarkers expression, while also maintaining their integrity for downstream analysis.

Bill Duong is a fifth year PhD student in the Shana Kelley laboratory. Currently he is enrolled in the chemistry department at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on developing and utilizing Microfluidics devices for the understanding of rare cancer cells and biomarkers to further understand cancer development and improve cancer screening.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: bill.duong@mail.utoronto.ca

Bill Duong

University of Toronto

Identifying lipid nanoparticle formulations for nasal RNA delivery targeting the murine respiratory mucosa

Lipid nanoparticles (LNP) have been successfully used as platform technology for delivering nucleic acids to the liver. To broaden LNP’s application in targeting non-hepatic tissues, we propose the development of an LNP-based gene silencing RNA (siRNA) therapy for the respiratory tract. Such optimized LNP systems could offer an early treatment strategy for respiratory viral infections such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Anthony Tam graduated with a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of British Columbia and pursued his PhD training at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital. His PhD research showed sex-related differences in a murine model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. He then pursued post-doctoral training at BC Children’s Hospital on gene editing and identified a novel mechanism controlling airway tissue remodeling. Recently, he joined Nanovation Therapeutics as a research scientist on the use of nanomedicine in targeting different tissue disease types.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: a.tam@nanovationtx.com

Dr. Anthony Tam

Nanovation Therapeutics

Bacteriopheophorbide nanoemulsions as photodynamic therapy agents

Bacteriochlorins are bio-compatible dyes which are well suited for photodynamic therapy due to their near infrared excitation wavelengths and high molar absorption coefficients. However, bacteriochlorins have limited utility in-vivo due to poor circulation kinetics. In this talk, I will describe our attempts at improving these circulation kinetics by creating novel bacteriochlorin-based nanoemulsions.

Wesley Walker received his BASc in Nanotechnology Engineering from the University of Waterloo, before moving to pursue an MSc in Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. Under the supervision of Dr. Gang Zheng, he is developing bacteriochlorin-based nanoemulsions for use in the treatment of cancer.

Poster coming soon – please check back

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: wesley.walker@mail.utoronto.ca

Wesley Walker

University of Toronto

View the presentations

The HQP Research Presentation Series gives NMIN HQP the opportunity to collaboratively develop their poster presentation skills, deliver a presentation in a supportive environment, and to receive constructive feedback from qualified professionals.

Fourth Round

NMIN HQP Research Presentations

29 July 2021

12:30 – 1:30 pm PDT | 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT

PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

More information coming soon – please check back

PRESENTERS

  • Kent Chen (PI: Marcel Bally)
  • Sheldon Decombe (PI: Aaron Wheeler)
  • Forugh Sanaee (PI: Afsaneh Lavasanifar)
  • Annie (Qurrat) Ul-Ain (PI: Sarah Hedtrich)

Cytopathology diagnostic with multiplexed plasmonic biomarkers

We present herein the development of a new technique, based on plasmonic labeling of live cells before fixation to improve the reliability of cytopathology diagnosis. This cost-effective and sensitive methodology is based on the optical properties of spectrally distinct metallic nanoparticles (NPs), in this case gold and gold-silver alloy NPs, conjugated with specific antibodies to target specific antigens.

Cécile Darviot obtained her engineering degree from École Centrale de Lille and her master’s degree from Polytechnique Montréal in 2018. After studying in vitro a new treatment for retinoblastoma based on the interaction between plasmonic nanoparticles and a nanosecond laser during her master’s thesis, she began a PhD at Polytechnique Montréal, in engineering physics, in January 2019. Her research project mainly focuses on hyperspectral optical imaging of plasmonic biomarkers for a wide range of biomedical applications including cyto– and histopathology.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: cecile.darviot@gmail.com

Cécile Darviot

École Polytechnique de Montréal

Development of a microfluidic chip for exosomal PD-L1 analysis in lung cancer

The use of exosomes as cancer biomarkers is receiving much attention lately due to recent discoveries of their involvement in key cancer physiological pathways. Unfortunately, exosomes are very hard to isolate and detect due to their small sizes. In the Kelley Lab, we have developed a technology that allows for the isolation and sorting of exosomes based on their protein biomarkers expression, while also maintaining their integrity for downstream analysis.

Bill Duong is a fifth year PhD student in the Shana Kelley laboratory. Currently he is enrolled in the chemistry department at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on developing and utilizing Microfluidics devices for the understanding of rare cancer cells and biomarkers to further understand cancer development and improve cancer screening.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: bill.duong@mail.utoronto.ca

Bill Duong

University of Toronto

Identifying lipid nanoparticle formulations for nasal RNA delivery targeting the murine respiratory mucosa

Lipid nanoparticles (LNP) have been successfully used as platform technology for delivering nucleic acids to the liver. To broaden LNP’s application in targeting non-hepatic tissues, we propose the development of an LNP-based gene silencing RNA (siRNA) therapy for the respiratory tract. Such optimized LNP systems could offer an early treatment strategy for respiratory viral infections such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Anthony Tam graduated with a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of British Columbia and pursued his PhD training at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital. His PhD research showed sex-related differences in a murine model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. He then pursued post-doctoral training at BC Children’s Hospital on gene editing and identified a novel mechanism controlling airway tissue remodeling. Recently, he joined Nanovation Therapeutics as a research scientist on the use of nanomedicine in targeting different tissue disease types.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: a.tam@nanovationtx.com

Dr. Anthony Tam

Nanovation Therapeutics

Bacteriopheophorbide nanoemulsions as photodynamic therapy agents

Bacteriochlorins are bio-compatible dyes which are well suited for photodynamic therapy due to their near infrared excitation wavelengths and high molar absorption coefficients. However, bacteriochlorins have limited utility in-vivo due to poor circulation kinetics. In this talk, I will describe our attempts at improving these circulation kinetics by creating novel bacteriochlorin-based nanoemulsions.

Wesley Walker received his BASc in Nanotechnology Engineering from the University of Waterloo, before moving to pursue an MSc in Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. Under the supervision of Dr. Gang Zheng, he is developing bacteriochlorin-based nanoemulsions for use in the treatment of cancer.

Poster coming soon – please check back

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: wesley.walker@mail.utoronto.ca

Wesley Walker

University of Toronto

View the presentations

The HQP Research Presentation Series gives NMIN HQP the opportunity to collaboratively develop their poster presentation skills, deliver a presentation in a supportive environment, and to receive constructive feedback from qualified professionals.

More sessions are being planned…

Second Round

NMIN HQP Research Presentations

Thursday 29 April 2021

12:30 – 1:30 pm PDT | 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT

PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

PRESENTERS

Play Video

Cytopathology diagnostic with multiplexed plasmonic biomarkers

We present herein the development of a new technique, based on plasmonic labeling of live cells before fixation to improve the reliability of cytopathology diagnosis. This cost-effective and sensitive methodology is based on the optical properties of spectrally distinct metallic nanoparticles (NPs), in this case gold and gold-silver alloy NPs, conjugated with specific antibodies to target specific antigens.

Cécile Darviot obtained her engineering degree from École Centrale de Lille and her master’s degree from Polytechnique Montréal in 2018. After studying in vitro a new treatment for retinoblastoma based on the interaction between plasmonic nanoparticles and a nanosecond laser during her master’s thesis, she began a PhD at Polytechnique Montréal, in engineering physics, in January 2019. Her research project mainly focuses on hyperspectral optical imaging of plasmonic biomarkers for a wide range of biomedical applications including cyto– and histopathology.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: cecile.darviot@gmail.com

Cécile Darviot

École Polytechnique de Montréal

Play Video

Development of a microfluidic chip for exosomal PD-L1 analysis in lung cancer

The use of exosomes as cancer biomarkers is receiving much attention lately due to recent discoveries of their involvement in key cancer physiological pathways. Unfortunately, exosomes are very hard to isolate and detect due to their small sizes. In the Kelley Lab, we have developed a technology that allows for the isolation and sorting of exosomes based on their protein biomarkers expression, while also maintaining their integrity for downstream analysis.

Bill Duong is a fifth year PhD student in the Shana Kelley laboratory. Currently he is enrolled in the chemistry department at the University of Toronto. His research focuses on developing and utilizing Microfluidics devices for the understanding of rare cancer cells and biomarkers to further understand cancer development and improve cancer screening.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: bill.duong@mail.utoronto.ca

Bill Duong

University of Toronto

Play Video

Identifying lipid nanoparticle formulations for nasal RNA delivery targeting the murine respiratory mucosa

Lipid nanoparticles (LNP) have been successfully used as platform technology for delivering nucleic acids to the liver. To broaden LNP’s application in targeting non-hepatic tissues, we propose the development of an LNP-based gene silencing RNA (siRNA) therapy for the respiratory tract. Such optimized LNP systems could offer an early treatment strategy for respiratory viral infections such as the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Anthony Tam graduated with a BSc in Biochemistry from the University of British Columbia and pursued his PhD training at the Centre for Heart Lung Innovation at St. Paul’s Hospital. His PhD research showed sex-related differences in a murine model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. He then pursued post-doctoral training at BC Children’s Hospital on gene editing and identified a novel mechanism controlling airway tissue remodeling. Recently, he joined Nanovation Therapeutics as a research scientist on the use of nanomedicine in targeting different tissue disease types.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: a.tam@nanovationtx.com

Dr. Anthony Tam

Nanovation Therapeutics

Play Video

Bacteriopheophorbide nanoemulsions as photodynamic therapy agents

Bacteriochlorins are bio-compatible dyes which are well suited for photodynamic therapy due to their near infrared excitation wavelengths and high molar absorption coefficients. However, bacteriochlorins have limited utility in-vivo due to poor circulation kinetics. In this talk, I will describe our attempts at improving these circulation kinetics by creating novel bacteriochlorin-based nanoemulsions.

Wesley Walker received his BASc in Nanotechnology Engineering from the University of Waterloo, before moving to pursue an MSc in Medical Biophysics at the University of Toronto. Under the supervision of Dr. Gang Zheng, he is developing bacteriochlorin-based nanoemulsions for use in the treatment of cancer.

Poster coming soon – please check back

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: wesley.walker@mail.utoronto.ca

Wesley Walker

University of Toronto

View the presentations

The HQP Research Presentation Series gives NMIN HQP the opportunity to collaboratively develop their poster presentation skills, deliver a presentation in a supportive environment, and to receive constructive feedback from qualified professionals.

First Round

Thursday 25 March 2021

12:30 – 1:30 pm PDT | 3:30 – 4:30 pm EDT

PRESENTATIONS / POSTERS

PRESENTERS

Play Video

Stable J-aggregation of an aza- BODIPY-lipid in a liposome for optical cancer imaging

We present the synthesis of a novel aza-BODIPY-lipid building block and its self-assembly into BODIPYsome, which has optically stable NIR J-aggregation that is attributed to -J-dimerization. BODIPYsomes exhibit a high extinction coefficient and high fluorescence quenching, enabling photoacoustic when intact and recovered NIR fluorescence once disrupted for in vivo cancer imaging.

Miffy Hok Yan Cheng received her B.Sc. (Hons) in Chemistry with Molecular Medicine in 2014 from the University of Hull, UK. She obtained a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry with Prof Ross Boyle in 2018 at the same institution. Her PhD studies included the development of NIR fluorescence probe and the bioconjugation to targeting moieties such as antibodies and peptides. After her PhD, she began her postdoctoral fellow position in Princess Margaret Cancer Centre with Prof Gang Zheng in 2018, and since her research has been focused on the synthesis and development of organic building blocks for lipid-based nanotechnologies in biomedical imaging.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: hok-yan.cheng@uhnresearch.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.

Miffy Cheng

Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Play Video

Nanoparticle Enhanced, Impedance-Based Biosensor Development for Cancer Diagnosis

Current research shows urinary metabolites can be classified as biomarkers for colon cancer. Colon cancer is primarily diagnosed with colonoscopies and blood tests: both of which are extremely invasive. It is our goal to develop a biosensor that uses nanoparticles bound with metabolites for normalization, to detect the presence of free metabolites in the urine samples of patients.

Payton LeBlanc is a third year student completing her Bachelor of Science specializing in Immunology and Infection. She is currently interning as an undergraduate researcher at the Wishart Lab located at the University of Alberta. For the past six months, she has participated in developing an impedance-based biosensor that utilizes nanoparticles to enhance colon cancer diagnostics.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: pleblanc@ualberta.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.
PAYTON

Payton LeBlanc

University of Alberta

Play Video

Microfluidic Co-encapsulation of Curcumin with SN-38 in PCL-block-PEO Polymer Nanoparticles

In this presentation, I describe my work co-encapsulating the chemotherapy drug SN-38 with curcumin in polymer nanoparticles, using microfluidic nanoprecipitation. Curcumin improves the encapsulation efficiency of SN-38 and changes the physico-chemical properties of the particle.

Liza Silverman graduated from MIT with a BSc in biology and from Hebrew University of Jerusalem with an MSc in biochemistry. She is currently a PhD candidate at the University of Victoria in the department of chemistry, studying nanoparticles for drug delivery. She also studied nanoparticles, and particularly Doxil, while working in industry. Her current research in the group of Prof. Matt Moffitt focuses on encapsulating SN-38 in polymer nanoparticles. She is working to increase the encapsulation efficiency of SN-38. When not in the lab, Liza enjoys knitting and being anywhere near the ocean.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: silverman.liza@gmail.com

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.
LIZA

Liza Silverman

University of Victoria

Play Video

An analysis of the function and structure of the protein corona on nanoparticles

Nanomaterials can adsorb blood proteins on their surface, forming the so-called protein corona. In this study, we studied the function and structure of these adsorbed proteins. We also demonstrated how this information could help us design better nanomaterials for in vivo use.

Johnny Zhang is a 5th year PhD student from Professor Warren Chan’s lab at the University of Toronto. He studies nanomaterial-protein interactions and designs functional nanomaterials for applications in medicine. He also develops immunoassay using nanomaterials for diagnosing infectious diseases like SARS-CoV-2. He obtained BSc from Mount Allison University with First Class Honours with distinction.

Click on the poster for a PDF version.

Please contact the poster author with any questions or comments: johnnykta.zhang@mail.utoronto.ca

Feel free to comment on the science, the efficacy of the poster, and possibilities for improvement.

JOHNNY

Johnny Zhang

University of Toronto

View all the presentations

The HQP Research Presentation Series gives NMIN HQP the opportunity to collaboratively develop their poster presentation skills, deliver a presentation in a supportive environment, and to receive constructive feedback from qualified professionals.